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Recovery Elevator 🌴

It isn't a NO to alcohol, but a YES to a better life! Best selling author Paul Churchill, along with Kristopher Oyen interview people who have stepped away from alcohol in their own lives. Each week this podcast does a deep dive into an exploration of what a booze free life might look like from various perspectives and opinions.  If you are sick and tired of alcohol making you sick and tired, we invite you to listen to Recovery Elevator. Check out what an alcohol free life can look like as others share their own stories of sobriety. If you are sober curious, newly sober, supporting a loved one or living your best life already in recovery, then you are in the right place. This podcast addresses what to do if you’re addicted to alcohol, or if you think you’re an alcoholic. Other topics include, does moderate drinking work, does addiction serve a purpose, what happens to the brain when we quit drinking, should you track sobriety time, is A.A. right for you, spirituality, and more. Similar to other recovery podcasts like This Naked Mind, the Shair Podcast, and the Recovered Podcast, Paul and Kris discuss a topic and then interview someone who has ditched the booze.
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Now displaying: 2016
Jul 4, 2016

Ty, sober since March 2008, shares how she implements service into her life to stay sober.

I want to give a huge personal thank you to Ty for helping me with the Recovery Elevator podcast. I can't do any of this alone. Thank you Ty.

Also in this episode I interview Jesse from My Sober Roommate.

 

Don’t forget to support the Recovery Elevator Podcast by shopping at Amazon with the Recovery Elevator link:

www.recoveryelevator.com/amazon/

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

Jun 27, 2016

Kevin, in remission for 13 years, shares his story and why he created We Face it Together.

 

Jun 20, 2016

Kellie, with 2 years of sobriety, shares how she has been successful in sobriety.

 

Kellie has been part of the Recovery Elevator podcast since the beginning. She was written blog posts, helped line up interviewees and helps with social media.

Don’t forget to support the Recovery Elevator Podcast by shopping at Amazon with the Recovery Elevator link:

www.recoveryelevator.com/amazon/

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

Jun 13, 2016

Stephen, with 32 years of sobriety, explains how he's made it this far.

 

I often get asked if any of the interviewees on this show have relapsed and the answer is yes. Sure, some of them have relapsed, but how many. When I really got to thinking about this, my optimism wavered and when I dug deeper into the question, I realized it was more than just a few had relapsed; it was a lot.

Don’t forget to support the Recovery Elevator Podcast by shopping at Amazon with the Recovery Elevator link:

www.recoveryelevator.com/amazon/

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

Jun 6, 2016

Matt, sober since 12/11/15, who is the 4th lawyer to be interviewed on this podcast, shares how leaving a law firm to start a private law practice while drinking, can be tumultuous; to say the least.

 

I got the idea for this podcast from the a article I recently read in the Fix called My Top Five Female Recovery Memoirs by Regina Walker .

 

Statistically, women don’t recover from alcoholism at nearly the rate men do. A study in Germany concluded that alcoholism was twice as fatal for women as for men. The women in the German study with alcohol addiction were five times more likely to die during the 14-year period of the study than women in the general population.

 

As a culture, we often judge women with addiction issues far more harshly than we do with men. Alcohol advertising often portrays men drinking as a bonding experience, while portraying women who drink as sexual predators or, at the very least, sexually objectified (“if she is going to get drunk, she is asking for it”). Though it’s difficult for anyone with a substance abuse issue to ask for help, it is that much more difficult for a woman, who often bears an additional, gender specific stigma.

 

Turnabout, by Jean Kirkpatrick

Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood by Koren Zailckas,

Blackout Girl: Growing Up and Drying Out in America by Jennifer Storm

Drunk Mom by Jowita Bydlowska

Yellow Tale, by Tiffany Goik

 

Don’t forget to support the Recovery Elevator Podcast by shopping at Amazon with the Recovery Elevator link: www.recoveryelevator.com/amazon/

 

 

May 30, 2016

Buddy, with 7 years of sobriety, bounced in an out of AA for from 2002-2008 before something finally stuck and ironically, he explains how drinking actually saved his life.

 

Don’t forget to support the Recovery Elevator Podcast by shopping at Amazon with the Recovery Elevator link: www.recoveryelevator.com/amazon/

 

I read the following line out of an AA Grapevine, August 2013 issue, while on a tumultuous ride over a high altitude Andean pass in Chile. It didn’t help that I was only 2 days sober (relapsed shortly after reading that line and ended up vomiting on myself and the bus) and I thought a relationship would solve my problems.

 

Page 53 in the 12&12:

The primary fact that we fail to recognize is our total inability to form a true partnership with another human being.

May 23, 2016

James with over 2.5 years of sobriety shares how we earned his family's trust back.

Being sober has huge advantages at the workplace and this should be marketed as such.

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Support the podcast and make your Amazon purchases through the Recovery Elevator affiliate link. 1/2 of all revenues will go to recovery non-profits.

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

May 16, 2016

In this episode Angela, with nearly 10 months of sobriety, shares how she did it.

Here are some great movies about alcohol, sobriety, recovery, drunkenness, and getting sober!

 

Thank you to Marueen from Cafe RE who helped put this list together!

  1. Burnt (2015) Bradley Cooper 1 hour, 40 minutes Comedy/Drama

    Synopsis:
    Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) is a chef who destroyed his career with drugs and diva behavior. He cleans up and returns to London, determined to redeem himself by spearheading a top restaurant that can gain three Michelin stars.
    Director: John Wells
    Writers: Steven Knight (screenplay), Michael Kalesniko (story)
    Stars: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Daniel Brühl | See full cast & crew »

    2.  Smashed (2012) Aaron Paul 1 hour, 21 minutes Drama

    Synopsis:

    A married couple whose bond is built on a mutual love of alcohol gets their relationship put to the test when the wife decides to get sober.
    Director: James Ponsoldt
    Writers: Susan Burke, James Ponsoldt
    Stars: Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Aaron Paul, Nick Offerman | See full cast & crew »

    3.  Everything Must Go (2010) Will Farrell
    Comedy/Drama

    Synopsis:

    When an alcoholic relapses, causing him to lose his wife and his job, he holds a yard sale on his front lawn in an attempt to start over. A new neighbor might be the key to his return to form.
    Director: Dan Rush
    Writers: Dan Rush, Raymond Carver (short story "Why Don't You Dance")
    Stars: Will Ferrell, Rebecca Hall, Christopher Jordan Wallace | See full cast & crew »

    4.  Shakes The Clown (1991) Bobcat Goldthwait Drama/Comedy/Murder

    Synopsis:

    Shakes plods about his duties as party clown, and uses all of his free time getting seriously drunk. Binky, another clown, wins the spot on a local kiddie show, which depresses Shakes even more, and his boss threatens him with unemployment if he can't get his act under control. When someone murders Shakes' boss and makes it look like Shakes did it, he goes undercover, posing as a hated mime, and tries to find information that will clear his name.
    - Written by Ed Sutton <

    5.  My Name Is Bill W. (1989) James Woods
    Drama (TV Movie)

    Synopsis:
    Based on the true story of Bill W. (James Woods), a successful stock broker whose life falls apart after the stock crash of the 20's and how he comes to grips with his alcoholism. Along with a fellow alcoholic (James Garner) he forms a support group that would eventually become Alcoholics Anonymous.
    - Written by Humberto Amador

    6.  Barfly (1987) Mickey Rourke
    Drama  1 hour, 40 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Based on the life of successful poet Charles Bukowski and his exploits in Hollywood during the 60s, 70s, and 80s.
    Director: Barbet Schroeder
    Writer: Charles Bukowski
    Stars: Mickey Rourke, Faye Dunaway, Alice Krige | See full cast & crew »

    7.  Crazy Heart (2009) Jeff Bridges,
    Drama/Music/ Romance  1 hour, 52 minutes

    Synopsis:
    A faded country music musician is forced to reassess his dysfunctional life during a doomed romance that also inspires him.
    Director: Scott Cooper
    Writers: Scott Cooper, Thomas Cobb (novel)
    Stars: Jeff Bridges, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Colin Farrell | See full cast & crew »

    8.  Days of Wine And Roses (1962) Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick
    Drama/ Romance

    Synopsis:
    An alcoholic falls in love with and gets married to a young woman, whom he systematically addicts to booze so they can share his "passion" together.
    Director: Blake Edwards
    Writer: J.P. Miller (as JP Miller)
    Stars: Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick, Charles Bickford | See full cast & crew »

    9.  Drunks (1995) Richard Lewis, Liza Harris    Drama

    Synopsis:
    At the beginning of a nightly Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, Jim seems particularly troubled. His sponsor encourages him to talk that night, the first time in seven months, so he does - and leaves the meeting right after. As Jim wanders the night, searching for some solace in his old stomping grounds, bars and parks where he bought drugs, the meeting goes on, and we hear the stories of survivors and addicts - some, like Louis, who claim to have wandered in looking for choir practice, who don't call themselves alcoholic, and others, like Joseph, whose drinking almost caused the death of his child - as they talk about their lives at the meeting.
    - Written by Gary Dickerson <slug@mail.utexas.edu>
    10.  Rachel Getting Married (2008) Anne Hathaway
    Drama 1 hour, 53 minutes

    Synopsis:
    A young woman who has been in and out of rehab for the past 10 years returns home for the weekend for her sister's wedding.
    Director: Jonathan Demme
    Writer: Jenny Lumet
    Stars: Anne Hathaway, Rosemarie DeWitt, Debra Winger | See full cast & crew »

    11.  Unguarded - The Chris Herren Story (2013) Chris Herren
    Drama

    Synopsis:
    Chris Herren was a "can't miss" basketball superstar until drug addiction eventually destroyed his career. With the support of his wife and family, Herren struggles to conquer his demons and reclaim his life.
    Director: Jonathan Hock
    Stars: Chris Herren, Rick Pitino, Bill Reynolds |See full cast & crew »

    12.  28 Days - Sandra Bullock (2000) Drama/Comedy 1 hour, 43 minutes

    Synopsis:
    A big-city newspaper columnist is forced to enter a drug and alcohol rehab center after ruining her sister's wedding and crashing a stolen limousine.
    Director: Betty Thomas
    Writer: Susannah Grant
    Stars: Sandra Bullock, Viggo Mortensen, Dominic West | See full cast & crew »

    13.  When A Man Loves A Woman - Meg Ryan,  Andy Garcia (1994)
    Drama 2 hours, 6 minutes

    Synopsis:
    An airline pilot and his wife are forced to face the consequences of her alcoholism when her addictions threaten her life and their daughter's safety. While the woman enters detox, her husband must face the truth of his enabling behavior.
    Director: Luis Mandoki
    Writers: Ronald Bass, Al Franken
    Stars: Meg Ryan, Andy Garcia, Ellen Burstyn | See full cast & crew »

    14.  Leaving Las Vegas - Nic Cage,  Elizabeth Shue (1995)
    Drama 1 hour, 51 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Nicolas Cage garnered a Best Actor Oscar for his hauntingly disturbing "Leaving Las Vegas" is a dark and tragic film that shows you how low you can fall and just how bad things can get. It portrays a dead-on picture of alcoholism and what exactly one goes through when they've hit rock bottom. As tragic as it is, this is a very beautiful and well-done film that keeps your attention to the bitter end.
    Ben Sanderson (Nicholas Cage) is an alcoholic who has nothing left to live for but the very booze that seems to be the only happiness he can find. His friends want nothing to do with him and women are disgusted by him. After being let go from his job, Ben burns all of his possessions and moves to Las Vegas, where his only plan is to drink himself to death. In a short amount of time he meets Sera (Elisabeth Shue), a lonely hooker who has been through it all. An unexpected bond is formed between the two and love falls upon them that can only end in tragedy.
    Boy, was this a hard movie to watch, but it was so well-done and executed. You are able to sympathize with both Ben and Sera, despite the paths they have chosen. Nicholas Cage was amazing and brilliant. No wonder why he won an Academy Award for his performance. You really buy into the fact that he is this sad character who wants nothing more but to destroy himself by the only thing that can bring him some sense of false happiness. Shue is also terrific in her role and should be applauded as well. The two are explosive as a team and can really bring the house down.
    The DVD is fair; nothing too special. You can have your choice of either watching the movie in widescreen or full screen. The picture for the most part looks good; not the best, but good. The main special feature this DVD offers is a trailer for the film and a bonus secret page.Read more ›

    15.  Clean And Sober - Michael Keaton  (1988)
    Drama 1 hour, 51 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Nicolas Cage garnered a Best Actor Oscar for his hauntingly disturbing
    A hustling drug addict checks himself into rehab to escape trouble with the law, and realizes that it's exactly what he needs.
    Director: Glenn Gordon Caron
    Writer: Tod Carroll
    Stars: Michael Keaton, Kathy Baker, Morgan Freeman | See full cast & crew »

    16.  The Basketball Diaries - Leonardo DiCaprio   (1995)
    Drama/Biography 1 hour, 42 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Nicolas Cage garnered a Best Actor Oscar for his hauntingly disturbing
    A teenager finds his dreams of becoming a basketball star threatened after he free falls into the harrowing world of drug addiction.
    Director: Scott Kalvert
    Writers: Jim Carroll (novel), Bryan Goluboff (screenplay)
    Stars: Leonardo DiCaprio, Lorraine Bracco, Marilyn Sokol |

    17.   The Lost Weekend (1945) Drama 1 hour, 41 minutes

    Synopsis:
    The desperate life of a chronic alcoholic is followed through a four day drinking bout.
    Director: Billy Wilder
    Writers: Charles R. Jackson (from the novel by), Charles Brackett (screen play) |1 more credit »
    Stars: Ray Milland, Jane Wyman, Phillip Terry | See full cast & crew

    18.   Shame (2011) Drama 1 hour, 41 minutes

    Synopsis:
    In New York City, Brandon's carefully cultivated private life -- which allows him to indulge his sexual addiction -- is disrupted when his sister arrives unannounced for an indefinite stay.
    Director: Steve McQueen
    Writers: Steve McQueen, Abi Morgan | 1 more credit »
    Stars: Michael Fassbender, Carey Mulligan, James Badge Dale | See full cast & crew »

    19. Postcards From The Edge   (1990) Drama 1 hour, 41 minutes

    Synopsis:
    A substance-addicted actress tries to look on the bright side even as she is forced to move back in with her mother to avoid unemployment.
    Director: Mike Nichols
    Writers: Carrie Fisher (book), Carrie Fisher (screenplay)
    Stars: Meryl Streep, Shirley MacLaine, Dennis Quaid | See full cast & crew

    20. Flight   (2012) Drama
    2 hours, 10 minutes

    Synopsis:
    An airline pilot saves almost all his passengers on his malfunctioning airliner which eventually crashed, but an investigation into the accident reveals something troubling.
    Director: Robert Zemeckis
    Writer: John Gatins
    Stars: Denzel Washington, Nadine Velazquez, Don Cheadle | See full cast & crew

    21. Thanks For Sharing  (2013) Drama/Comedy 2 hours, 10 minutes

    Synopsis:
    A romantic comedy that brings together three disparate characters who are learning to face a challenging and often confusing world as they struggle together against a common demon: sex addiction.
    Director: Stuart Blumberg
    Writers: Stuart Blumberg, Matt Winston
    Stars: Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow | See full cast & crew

    22. Suck It Up Buttercup  (2014) Drama 1 hours, 27 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Drug addiction's collateral damage is starkly revealed when a former honor student, newly addicted to prescription pills, triggers a chain of events that devastates her friends and threatens to tear her family apart.
    Director: Malindi Fickle
    Writers: Malindi Fickle, Kris Lienert
    Stars: Lacy Marie Meyer, Robyn Ross, Gregory Konow | See full cast & crew

    23. Half Nelson (2006) Drama 1 hours, 46 minutes

    Synopsis:
    An inner-city junior high school teacher with a drug habit forms an unlikely friendship with one of his students after she discovers his secret.
    Director: Ryan Fleck
    Writers: Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden
    Stars: Ryan Gosling, Anthony Mackie, Shareeka Epps | See full cast & crew

    24. Amy (2015) Documentary 2 hours, 8 minutes

    Synopsis:
    The story of Amy Winehouse in her own words, featuring unseen archival footage and unheard tracks.
    Director: Asif Kapadia
    Stars: Amy Winehouse, Mitch Winehouse, Mark Ronson | See full cast & crew

    25. The Anonymous People (2013) Documentary 1 hour, 28 minutes

    Synopsis:
    Recovery is OUT - to change the addiction conversation from problems to SOLUTIONS. An independent feature documentary about the over 23 million Americans living in long-term recovery from alcohol and other drug addictions.
    Director: Greg D. Williams
    Writers: Aaron Cohen, Bud Mikhitarian | 2 more credits »
    Stars: Tom Coderre, Tara Conner, Laurie Dhue | See full cast & crew »

 

Here are some movie titles I recommend to shy away from in sobriety!

Beer Fest, American Pie 1-11, PCU, Teen Wolf, Mean Girls, Rules of Attraction, Dazed and Confused, Boogie Nights, Trainspotting, Eurotrip, Weird Science, Clueless, Superbad, Sixteen Candles, Old School, House Party, Bachelor Party, Roadtrip, Revenge of the Nerds, Can't Hardly Wait, Animal House, 21 and Over, Project X, Great Gatsby, This is the End, 21/22 Jump Street and Wolf on Wall Street.

 

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Support the podcast and make your Amazon purchases through the Recovery Elevator affiliate link. 1/2 of all revenues will go to recovery non-profits.

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

May 9, 2016

In this episode Rachael, with 2.5 years of sobriety, shares how she did it.

I got the idea for today's topic from an article I read by Sarah A Benton called: Why some phase out of college binge drinking and others are alcoholic. It piggy backs perfectly off last weeks episode with Johnny Manziel. Manziel appears not to be growing out of this phase and it's becoming apparent he has a real problem with alcohol.

Why do some people simply not "grow out" of this phase? Here are some reasons the article states:

• The Surgeon General's 2007 "Call to Action" report indicates that genetics account for 50% of the risk of developing alcoholism, therefore, family history is one of the strongest determinations of who may be alcoholic. In addition, the drinking culture of the individual's family and the role that alcohol plays.

• The age that he or she began drinking is another key factor. Specifically, research by the NIAAA indicates that teens who begin drinking before the age of 15 have a 40% greater chance of becoming alcoholic with or without a family history of alcoholism.

• Certain work or graduate school environments tend to incorporate alcohol into their social events such as going out after work or class for drinks or drinking while networking (ie, law, business). These cultures may normalize heavy drinking and also breed a "work hard, play hard" mentality that enables alcoholic drinking patterns.

• The drinking patterns of the group of friends that he or she lives with or socializes with. Heavy drinkers tend to migrate towards spending time with others who drink like they do and this often allows them to justify and minimize their excessive drinking.

• The individual's predispositions toward mental illness (such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety) or a trauma history (PTSD) may lead he or she to self-medicate with alcohol.

Impulse-control issues that include thrill-seeking behaviors and a need for immediate gratification.

• Certain drinking patterns are "red flags" for alcoholism including: blacking out (ie, memory loss when drinking),inability to have just 1-2 drinks, obsessing about alcohol, rotating their social life around alcohol, drinking daily or frequently, behaving in shameful ways while drunk, always needing to drink excessively before going to a party (ie, "pre-partying") and surrounding themselves with peers who drink heavily.

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Support the podcast and make your Amazon purchases through the Recovery Elevator affiliate link. 1/2 of all revenues will go to recovery non-profits.

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

May 2, 2016

Kelly, with 9.5 months sobriety shares how she did it!

 

Johnny Manziel is an alcoholic who isn't having any fun. We has drafted 22nd overall in the 2014 NFL draft and the wheels have been coming off since. The media seem to wonder why he hasn't simply grown out of his crazy party lifestyle and realized his potential a an NFL quarterback. It was refreshing to see an article in written in the Bleacher Report about how Johnny's problem isn't a maturity one, but a clinical one.

Apr 25, 2016

Robert, who has been sober for nearly 3.5 years shares how he has made it this far.

In this episode we hear from Shawn from the Model Health Show Podcast and he gives us valuable tips on how to get a grip on alcoholism with these tips and tricks. Below are links to some of the items he mentions in the podcast.

Rebounder - Mini trampoline for cardio. NASA says this is the most effective form of exercise and detoxification. Moves your lymphatic system and starts to remove the muck that has built up into our systems over years of drinking. Start with no more than 10 minutes. . This helps drop your cortisol levels which will reduce stress throughout the day.

Magnesium - Key to the early sobriety.

Spirulina - Highest form of protein in the world by weight. Rich in B vitamins

Vitamin B2 - Riboflavin (B2) great for depression

Vitam B3 - Niacin. Helps capillaries dilate and get blood to your system and help eliminate waste in the body.

Vitamin B12 - Great for Energy

Multi B Vitamin - A great combination of all the B Vitamins.

Green Super Food Blend - Not processed in a laboratory and is great for early recovery.

 

Shawn's Bio:
Shawn Stevenson is a bestselling author and creator of The Model Health Show, featured as the #1 Health podcast in the country on iTunes. A graduate of The University of Missouri - St. Louis, Shawn studied business, biology and kinesiology, and went on to be the founder of Advanced Integrative Health Alliance, a company that provides wellness services for individuals and organizations worldwide. Shawn has been featured in Entrepreneur magazine, Men's Health magazine, ESPN, FOX News, and many other media outlets. He is also a frequent keynote speaker for numerous organizations, universities, and conferences - all with outstanding reviews. To learn more about Shawn visit TheModelHealthShow.com

Join Team RE on May 21st for the 3rd annual run for recovery at AALRM.org and use promo code Recovery Elevator for a 10% discount.

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Cafe RE and get your daily AA email here!

Apr 18, 2016

With 91 days of sobriety, Sarah shares how she did it!

In this podcast episode I cover an article from Sober Nation covering why Alcohol is such a potent drug.

Sarah also shares how she made it to 91 days of sobriety!

In this episode I review The Staying Sober Handbook, by Howard P Goodman and I would definitely recommend it for someone who is in recovery or as an informational piece if you want to know more about the disease in general.

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

In this episode I review The Staying Sober Handbook, by Howard P Goodman and I would definitely recommend it for someone who is in recovery or as an informational piece if you want to know more about the disease in general.

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

Apr 11, 2016

Johan, who has been sober since November 15, 2015, shares how he did it.

 

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

Apr 4, 2016

Molly Shares how she has made it to almost 30 days sober. I also interview my brother who has stuck with me from day one. I expected Mark to understand my pains, struggles and inner thoughts. I even developed unnecessary resentments towards him which he didn't deserve.

 

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

Mar 28, 2016

Matt from California shares how he has made it over 5 years sober. He went to seek treatment for PTSD and realized he was also an alcoholic.

In this episode I discuss the not so smooth transition from a free community to a paid community. Below is is the post I placed in the group trying to clarify the point of the transition.

 

“I woke up this morning and binge listened to the Recovery Elevator podcast, and later that day I went to my very first AA meeting/Told my spouse/reached out for help...” I have received probably 75 of these messages.... Recovery Elevator is not about me, it’s not about the people in this group, it’s about the people who are still struggling.

I’ll be the first one to admit, I am flawed. I am far from perfect. I am fully aware I have made several mistakes and (“spoiler alert”) I will make many more mistakes moving forward. I think my biggest mistake thus far is not being able to communicate my vision for Recovery Elevator and why this transition is taking place. Sure it’s about sustainability, and the time commitment is not feasible over time. However, our #1 goal, the mission, the force that continues to find the RE team at the same coffee shop every Friday morning at 7am for almost a year now is to shred the shame. Does that sound familiar?  What that means in one word is Stigma.

The stigma surrounding this disease is just as lethal if not more potent than alcohol itself. It was this stigma that led me to a failed suicide attempt in the summer of 2014. I hated myself for not being able to drink like a normal person and was ashamed. I was even more upset when the suicide attempt didn’t work. I woke up that morning pissed off and angry. I wasn’t happy to be taking in precious breaths of air with a new outlook on my 2nd chance on life. I was devastated I had to keep on living my life of misery from the disease. Can anyone think of another disease where we let ourselves and loved ones get to the most critical point before treatment or help arrives? Many times, that assistance arrives at a car crash when it’s too late (my friend in 2006) and our friends don’t get a second chance. Why do alcoholic bottoms have to be so low???? The Stigma.

A gentlemen, who removed himself from the group (We didn't), brought up some great points last night and I’m very glad he did. Before this message goes any further, I want to remind people that I have stated multiple times that Recovery Elevator is not affiliated with any 12 step or other recovery programs in particular Alcoholics Anonymous. I am just about to complete my own 12 steps and I plan on passing on that “service” with a sponsee when I finish. This person mentions RE is preying on people with monetization goals. It doesn’t any ivy league business degree to make that connection.  If I want a fighting chance at battling this stigma, I am going to need resources.

This may come as a surprise, but I’m definitely not the first one to prey on alcoholics and here are some examples: Budweiser, Miller, Coors, Pabst, Jose Cuervo, Jack Daniels, Crown Royal, Smirnoff, Boones, Corona, rehab facilities,  and many more are also targeting alcoholics. Battling the the stigma with resources will be tough, but shredding the shame with a cash flow of -$200 a month is a near insurmountable task. Think of the monthly fee going to the struggling alcoholic and not Recovery Elevator. Perhaps in 2014, if I saw a Recovery Elevator sponsored Facebook ad instead of a Bud Light Lime ad, I wouldn’t have bolted to a liquor store before they closed at 2:00 AM. A profitable sober travel company? I must be missing something, is there anything wrong with that?  When I was 24, I went on what seemed to be a very profitable, packed booze cruise in Cabo, Mexico, and my actions on that boat were probably more shameful than trying create a sustainable operation which provides services to people like myself.  I personally would have loved to go on sober adventure travel. Imagine being on an airplane and in the in flight magazine you see an add for a 7 day sober trip through the Grand Canyon. Am I supposed to not create a sober travel company due to traditions Recovery Elevator has never aligned themselves with?

In my opinion, I wish the market was already saturated with Sober Travel companies, but unfortunately it’s not. Take a guess anyone why? The stigma. Look at the monthly fee as a fund for a common goal or the passing of the basket. I will not be getting rich off this, but for imaginative purposes, what if I did?? What if I became as rich as Bill Gates and I was open and proud about being an alcoholic. What if I even donated millions of dollars to recovery organizations.  Does it really matter if I get rich or not doing this?

This is my last post about this transition because my time needs to be spent trying to reach struggling alcoholics and not on people who are making the stigma even more inflammatory. I am going to give you a choice to make the transition at whatever price you would like, $1, $5, $8 or $10. If you have already signed up at $5  and would like to change to $1 per month, then email me at info@recoveryelevator.com and I will make the change.  If you do have negative comments, call me personally at 970-376-7558 and we can chat about why a Sober Travel ad during the Super Bowl is such a terrible and shameful thing.

 

$1
https://recovery-elevator-sandbox.chargify.com/subscribe/w96vt4f374kp/join_one
$5
https://recovery-elevator-sandbox.chargify.com/subscribe/dyzjt7zsv937/fivedollarsmonthly
$8
https://recovery-elevator-sandbox.chargify.com/subscribe/88c8hk957b5d/eight
$10
https://recovery-elevator-sandbox.chargify.com/subscribe/vkq76q3q7vnk/ten_dollars_monthly

 

 

 

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

Mar 21, 2016

In this episode Penni from Australia shares how she made is 6 months sober!

Also discussed in the episode the Radio Lab's podcast episode The Fix. Is there really a pill that an cure alcoholism? Believe me, I have searched high and low.....

 

Don't isolate yourself and join the discussion in the Recovery Elevator Private Forum.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

This episode was brought to you by Sober Travel and Sober Nation.

Mar 14, 2016

In this episode Bill, who has been sober October 22nd 2015, shares how to successfully navigate retirement as an alcohol. Also in this episode how exhausting and potentially dangerous it can be while drinking and traveling. That is when the light bulb for sober travel went off about two weeks.

Mar 7, 2016

Brandy shares how she has successfully made it to 69 days sober! I also talk about how I mapped out my talk to the largest school audience yet. Footage from this YouTube video to come shortly, but here the video that I made for the freshman and sophomore classes. 

 

-if when on vacation, every time you go out to eat with your boyfriend (who does not want you to drink) you make sure he sits in a place with his back to the bar so you can sneak a drink on your way to the bathroom. -Phenina

-if you wake up in the hospital and have to ask the nurse to help you look up impound lots after your car was totaled 4 days earlier and you have no recollection of where the accident happened. -Maureen

-if you check your bank online to find charges that you don't recognize...after all, you haven't been to that bar in months! You call the bar to contest the charge and then realize that it was your signature on the bill and you had been there in a blackout. -Jill

-if you get so desperate for mixers that you use mint tea or similar to mix your vodka, decided it tastes worse somehow, and just start doing shots, alone, on a Tuesday. -Sarje
-if your podcast app says you've heard those 15 podcasts, but you don't remember a single one. -Arista

 

Be sure to join the Recovery Elevator Private Accountability Facebook Group.

Come join the ultimate Recovery Elevator meet-up in Peru where we will be volunteering at orphanages with Peruvian Hearts, working with local alcoholics, and why not hike the 38 mile Inca Trail to Machu Picchu while were down there!

Feb 29, 2016

In episode 54, Gavin from England shares how he made it too 100 days of sobriety, and his humor in the accountability groups is what gave me the inspiration for this topic.

Ideas for this podcast topic came from an article I read on The Fix and the benefits of laughter are from Help Guide.

 

Feb 22, 2016

In this episode Dawn, shares how she has made it to 6 months of sobriety as a mother of three. We also discuss terminal uniqueness which basically is when we focus on the differences and not the similarities. I have been culpable of this many times, and I am working on being cognizant of how to avoid this. Here are some of the key reasons why terminal uniqueness is so dangerous.

-It allows people to ignore the likely consequences of their actions

-It provides a false sense of security

-It divides the world into me and them

-It means that the individual will be unwilling to believe that treatments that help other people can help them

-It leads to the individual thinking that they are either worse than everyone else, or that they are better than everyone else

-It prevents the individual from seeking help for their problems

-It can be a barrier to communication

-It leads to feelings of loneliness and desperation (isolation)****

Feb 15, 2016

What I learned in 1 year of podcast is remarkable. It will help me stay sober and I want to thank everyone who has been a part of Recovery Elevator. I really hope you enjoy this summary because I had a great year compiling them.

Value Bombs

What I learned from a year of podcasting about my sobriety.

By Paul Churchill (with Elliot P.)

 

Podcasting about your sobriety isn’t exactly the best way to stay anonymous.   However, after years of struggling to stay sober I was willing to try anything and nothing seemed more powerful than the accountability I’d create by checking in with “the world” every week.   So I bought a few simple pieces of recording equipment, signed up for a podcasting service and started talking.  I was terrified to release the first episode – it felt like I was jumping off a cliff.  I knew my life would never be the same.   I was right.

 

This year has been the best year of my life but strangely, also the hardest.   I know what you are thinking, “of course it was the hardest as getting sober isn’t easy” and you’d be right.  But there is something especially terrifying about getting sober in front of anyone who wants to watch.  I’ve been told that some people thought my podcast would be a train wreck and they were listening for entertainment value.   Luckily, so far, I have beaten the odds and probably made this pretty boring for my macabre listeners.   My goal is to make this podcast as boring as possible for this demographic of my audience!  How is that for a podcasting goal?  Really though, I think we have had a lot of fun this year and I’m all for the suspense each week as I sign in, once again, still sober.   If I can do it, maybe some of my listeners realize that they can too.

 

Now I don’t claim to be very smart but the most unexpected part of this journey has been meeting hundreds of listeners who can relate to my story.   I honestly felt like I was the only one who suffered exactly like I did.   It turns out that alcoholism is ironically a communal disease where everyone afflicted feels isolated.  Part of the solution involves finding like-minded people who you can get honest with.  Little did I know, just by talking openly into the microphone, this group of like-minded people would come to me.   Listenership has grown beyond my wildest dreams.  I love you guys.

 

I’ve been asked what have been the most impactful lessons I’ve learned over this year of podcasting.   The beauty of listening to the stories of those I’ve interviewed is that everyone can relate to the stories differently depending upon their place in their sobriety journey.  Below is a list highlighting ideas that have meant the most to me:

Feb 8, 2016

Scott, an attorney on the east coast, shares how he has reached 2.5 "great" months of sobriety.

Contempt prior to investigation!

Today marks the 51st episode of what started almost a year ago as a way for me to simply hold myself accountable. I made the commitment then to do at least 52 episodes and as I approach this number its hard not to be overwhelmed with the impact this podcast has had on myself and also, unexpectedly, on many of you.

I mean, first off, 51 episodes later, I’m still sober!  (1 year, 4 months and 6 days according to my recovery elevator app) – which is a miracle!  But I see an unintended consequence is that many of you are also finding ways to stay sober and find happiness in recovery.   It’s amazing to see what happens when we all put our minds together!

So for that, and all of you listening, I’m overwhelmed with gratitude. There is rarely a day that I don’t get an email from a listener who shares how touched they are by something one of our guests said on the podcast.   I mean there have been over 50 guests who have shared their story and these stories have been downloaded over 160,000 times.   The impact of us simply, and honestly, sharing our stories is bringing hope to many who might not have otherwise found it.  Please keep sending me emails with your story, I never get tired of reading them even if I don’t have time to respond to every one know that I read every one and cherish them all.

And because of you and your desire to continue the discussions after each podcast we started the private Facebook recovery elevator accountability group.  I remember being amazed when we reached 60 members of the group and as I release today’s podcast we are rapidly approaching 450 members with new members being added every day.   Its so amazing to see you all in the group sharing your story, asking questions, sharing wisdom and encouragement, checking in on each other and ultimately helping yourself and others stay sober.  And it’s because of the things happening in this group that we are in the final stages of setting up an even better platform for us all to interact outside the podcast which will be several regions accountability groups which feed into the community forum.

Its all something I could not have imagined a year ago and it is a testament to the power of what can happen when we get honest and get out of our comfort zone.   So, just in case you are wondering, I may get a bit sentimental and maybe even a bit emotional as we approach our 52nd episode but I’m not planning on stopping after our 52nd episode.  You guys have stuck with me so I’m staying here and stick’n with you.

You know, after doing today’s interview, I was reminded of one of the most devastating things I’ve noticed during this busy year of podcasting, being interviewed by others and speaking at schools.  It is the stigma associated with alcoholism.   Because most people don’t even know the definition of who an alcoholic really is, they associate it with the worst stereotypes society has with problem drinkers.   Bums under a bridge, domestic violence, liver cirrhosis, drunken driving, weak “will power” and the list can go on.    The truth is, I don’t even like to talk about this stigma because it seems to only strengthen it.   Heck, it is this stigma, and the repulsion we feel about being associated with this stigma that keep many of us from ever getting help!

The truth is, this stigma is wrong, dangerous, and it needs to change.   I’m thinking of coming up with a name for it, like I did for Gary – my addiction.   Maybe I’ll name this stigma Stanley. Sure, like any good lie, there may be an element of truth in this stigma but many of the people I’ve met over the last year have lives that in no way resemble this stereotype.  I think today’s guest is another good example of this.

Alcoholism, like many of this century’s hot social issues (race relations, women’s rights, gay rights, etc) also suffers from something I like to call “contempt prior to investigation.”  For when we really investigate who an alcoholic is we find that there is really only two defining factors:  1) We tend to have a mental obsession that makes it seem impossible to not have that first drink and  2) When we start drinking a physical allergy kicks in and we can’t control our drinking.    That’s it. Period.   Let me repeat it: 1) We tend to have a mental obsession that makes it seem impossible to not have that first drink and  2) When we start drinking a physical allergy kicks in and we can’t control our drinking.  Alcoholism has been defined as a disease by the American Medical Association in 1056 and it does not make person good or bad.  Period.

Do you guys want to know the crazy thing about this stigma?!... With all the alcoholics I have spoken with over the last year, and all the non-alcoholics, it is BY FAR the “still drinking alcoholic” who has the most negative association with the word alcoholic.  Normal drinkers often see it as a medical issue and one with treatment options.  Recovering alcoholics have often worked through the association and seem to have no problem being associated with the term.  Ironically, it’s the very people who need the help who have the most negative association with the word.

And if we have done one thing by sharing our stories this year, I hope it is that we’ve helped each of us realize that we are not all that different, and we are not all that bad!  In fact, most of us are making amazing and courageous progress in our lives.  We are doing the things that, I believe, we will find the most meaningful when reflecting back on our lives from our deathbed.   We are making amazing friendships, we are looking at our career not as a job but as a way to serve others, we are learning to love ourselves and we are finding joy.  We truly are the lucky ones.

So, it’s simple.  It’s not easy.  But it’s so simple when you take away the stigma!  Stanley, goodbye!

Our guest today, Scott, seems to have this figured out and I love when we talk about how being an alcoholic is only one area of our life and it by no means defines us.

In today’ talk he keeps it simple and he is a man of action.  He is a successful lawyer, who has raised a nice family of 4 kids and has been married for over 30 years.   By all accounts, looking in, he is living the dream.  He is highly functional, very intelligent, and what we call in Montana “a man’s man.”    But you will hear him say it: he regrets the “blank memories” or the memories not made while drinking.   He is a great, and honorable, person who see’s that drinking has held him back from truly being the person he was designed to be and he is making a change.

So as you listen today, be reminded that you too are on a journey of becoming the person YOU were designed to be.   For most of us it happens slowly as we continually take action applying the principles of recovery to our lives.  For others, like you will hear today, there can be a profound spiritual experience which kick-starts the process.    The key is, that no matter what the catalyst is, we never forget why we march this path of happy destiny.   It’s in this mindset and in our daily actions, that we find freedom from the obsession to drink and freedom to become a little more of the person we want to be.    I think you will find that today’s guest, Scott, is well on his way.

His story is so inspiring and so full of value bombs it could be a 2 part series! But instead of doing that, I’ll just encourage you to listen to a few powerful themes:

- Without saying it, Scott touches on all three of the first 12 steps in a powerful way.

- Scott is not a “wu-wu” spiritual guy and I cant help but be inspired by how profound spirituality is in his recovery.

- Scott’s journey from “contempt prior to investigation” of alcoholism to now having an acceptance that is super charging his life.

 

"You Might be an Alcoholic if" - Thank you Megan for compiling these for me on weekly basis.

-You go snow-snorkeling in the nude in Wisconsin. -Christine

-You know you are out of wine so you stop and "borrow" / steal a bottle from your in laws house on the way home. The next day when you go to replace "borrowed" /stolen bottle you get busted in their house and make up some lame story about how you were just looking for your child's coat that he may have left there. -Julie

-The only reason you write the newspaper is to advocate repealing the ban on Sunday alcohol sales. -Jon

-You are a youth elder at Church and decide, not only to drink before driving a van full of middle schoolers around town for a holiday event, but continue to drink while driving. The only reason you do not smoke the pot you have with you is that you did not get the chance. (but did so immediately after!) TY

-You might be an alcoholic if... you use a bar stool as a walker so you don't fall down!

Maggie

 

 

Be sure to join the Recovery Elevator Private Accountability Facebook Group.

Be sure to expand your recovery network in and Seattle on February 27th and San Francisco on March 5th. Dates for NYC, San Francisco, Denver Costa Rica and Norway are coming soon.

This episode was brought to you by Sober Nation.

 

Feb 1, 2016

In this podcast episode Cameron shares how he has successfully navigated nearly 6 months of sobriety.

In the early stages of a relationship, I was always terrified of the moment when I had to fess up to why I don't drink. I came up with every answer besides the honest answer which is the simple fact I'm an alcoholic. Below is my Match.com profile summary I created eight days ago. The results of this experiment have been miraculous. 2 years ago I would have been surprised by the results, but knowing my fear was completely irrational, I'm not surprised at all.

 

Hello, my name is Paul and I'm a recovering alcoholic, I'm extremely allergic to horses, at times I struggle with anxiety, and I have been diagnosed ADHD 4 different times by medical professionals.

You're probably wondering why I would lead off with this enticing intro, but after reading a couple profiles, I couldn't get a real idea of who the gals really were... so by being upfront, honest and transparent, I am saving both of us time.

None of these things truly define me, but this is an honest description of who I am. When I first started writing my profile it contained words like funny, outgoing, motivated, happy, and all the other generic descriptors, which do describe me, but I thought I would tell it straight.

 

 

You might be an alcoholic if..

 

- you walk your dog at night with a glass of beer in your hand!!! -Penni

 

.you make a trip to the liquor store for beer but forget the grocery store for the much needed milk. -Angela

 

- You go to pee before bed but realize in horror the next morning that you missed the toilet seat by an entire room. -Jamey

 

-You misplace things..like a decade -Dee

 

- The first thing you do in the morning is check your Facebook, email, and call record to see what you may have done the night before! -Kathy

Be sure to join the Recovery Elevator Private Accountability Facebook Group.

Be sure to expand your recovery network in and Seattle on February 27th and San Francisco on March 5th. Dates for NYC, San Francisco, Denver Costa Rica and Norway are coming soon.

This episode was brought to you by Sober Nation.

Jan 25, 2016

Colin shares how he has made it to 16 days of sobriety.

I'd like to give a special thanks to Maureen for helping me compile this great list of songs about recovery and getting sober. There are some great artists putting recovery on the map.

 

  1.  “Hate Me” - Blue October.  What alcoholic cannot relate to these lyrics?  I know I’ve felt this so many times.  When we disappoint our loved ones after a relapse or crisis.  It would be so much easier if they would just hate me and go away.  The voice of his mother can be heard at the beginning on his answering system.  She’s calling to check on him and see if he’s taken his medications. He’s got 90-days sober and wants to thank her.  Good song.
  1.  “You’re Not My God” - Keith Urban.  “You’re not my God and you’re not my friend.  You’re not the one I will walk with in the end”. I view this as a goodbye letter to alcohol and drugs.  It’s got a great message.  Urban is public with his recovery as well.
  1.  “That’s Why I’m Here” - Kenny Chesney.  This is a great song and it’s one man’s  take on his first AA meeting.  It gives the impression I know I’ve felt of wanting what other people had.  “They started talkin’ about steps you take. Mistakes you make and the hearts that we break”.  There are a lot of 12-step references and I found it so relatable.  In the beginning he says “Well I ain’t had nothin’ to drink. I knew that’s probably what you’d think”.  I know this hit a chord with me as people would often if I really was sober.
  1.  Macklemore has a bunch of good songs.  “Fallin’” has lyrics, “Another drink at the bar but I’m not drunk enough..”. He goes on to describe his downward spiral in pretty good detail.
  1. “Otherside” is a great song about relapse and how low that can make you feel.  He describes going back to a meeting after a relapse and a fan tells him how much he’s inspired her with her own recovery.  He can’t even look at her as he is so ashamed and feels like a “fake”. It’s a great song for starting all over.  Remember, relapse is part of recovery and I know I’ve beaten myself up so bad in the past.
  1.  “Inhale Deep” has an inspiring message about “...every struggle in life, is there to teach you a lesson...”.  “But if you make the end You will never know the beauty of being able to stand up again”.  Very powerful lyrics.
  1.  He has a new song for his next album entitled “Kevin”.  He teams up with Leon Bridges and this song talks about the epidemic of doctors prescribing medications and people getting addicted.  You can’t buy the single yet but I strongly recommend you watch the YouTube clip of the two of them performing it at an awards show this fall.  Leon Bridges is like a throw-back to Sam Cooke and says, “Doctor please, give me a dose of the American Dream.  Put down the pen and look in my eyes...we’re overprescribed”.  Great song.
  1.  “Not An Addict” - K’s Choice.  This song is clearly about heroin addiction and the denial of being an addict. The song says “We’re so creative, so much more.  We’re High but on the floor”.  “It’s not a habit, it’s cool.  I feel alive”.  It’s like they are trying to tell themselves that they can “stop anytime I want to” trying to justify their use.  Old 90s song but I think it’s powerful.
  1.  “Recover” - Natasha Bedingfield.  This is a great song and it is so positive.  She stresses “It’s now what we’ve done but, how far we’ve come”.  The message is: WE WILL RECOVER, the worst is over, now.

10 “God of Wine” - Third Eye Blind.  “She takes a drink and then she waits.  The alcohol it permeates.  And soon the cells give way. And cancel out the day”.  Wow, this is so true for me, that feeling that I was wasting my life away when drinking.  It also speaks of the frustration of “Where do we begin?” when new to recovery.

  1.  “The A-Team” - Ed Sheeran penned this one about a drug-addicted girl he met on the streets of London.  He befriended her and describes her as a “cool girl, with no phone”.  It sends the message of what lengths this girl goes to for her habit.
  1.  Sound City (Dave Grohl collaboration with Stevie Nicks and some other artists) “You Can’t Fix This” . It’s about dancing with the “devil” (addiction).  I know Stevie Nicks is vocal about her recovery.
  1. “One Day At A Time” - Joe Walsh
  2. “One Day At a Time” Yusaf Islam (the former Cat Stevens
  1. “Make Me A Channel Of Your Peace” - Sinead O’Connor.  I just like this song as it is the Third Step Prayer.  Its kind of somber though but pretty.
  1.  “Losing My Way” - Justin Timberlake.  “I used to be the man in my hometown until I started to lose my way”.  It spells out his downward spiral into addiction.
  1. “Sober” - Pink
  1.  “Amazing” - Aerosmith.  I think we’ve all known this band has long been in recovery.  Steven hit a rough patch in 2006 with painkillers after surgery but checked back into rehab and has since been okay.  This song is great as it tells how his life is “amazing” post recovery.  How inspiring for all of us struggling!
  1.  “Leave The Light On”  Beth Hart.  She says, “I want to love. I want to live. I don’t know much about it.  I never did. Seventeen and I’m all messed up inside.  I cut myself just to feel alive”.  Wow, what pain is she in....who cannot relate?  Addiction sucks!
  1.  "Semi-Charmed Life” - Third Eye Blind (your band) “Doing crystal meth with lift you up until you break”.  “We tripped on the edge of wanting  to feel alive and now I’m struggling to stay alive!

Be sure to join the Recovery Elevator Private Accountability Facebook Group.

Be sure to expand your recovery network in and Seattle on February 27th and San Francisco on March 5th. Dates for NYC, San Francisco, Denver Costa Rica and Norway are coming soon.

This episode was brought to you by Sober Nation.

Jan 18, 2016

James with 8 days of sobriety shares why he wants to quit.

There was a period of time from around 2004-2014 where I could not look at myself in the mirror. I didn't want to admit it, but I was disgusted with myself. I didn't recognize the person standing there and I didn't know what to do about it. I thought the problem was others, I thought the problem was stress, I thought the problem was anxiety and depression. I definitely wasn't ready to examine the problem could possibly be my ally alcohol. No way. Not at all. That couldn't be the problem. Nope.

It wasn't until I reached emotional sobriety in 2014 when I started to catch glimpses of the real Paul Churchill in the mirror. It didn't happen day one of sobriety. It didn't happen day 30. But like the seasons change, I was eventually able to look myself in the mirror without total disgust. Fast forward to January 18th, 2016. I embrace that man in the mirror. We challenge each other to be better. To make others better and that man in the mirror is my best friend. Here is the poem a football coach read to us in High School.

 

The Guy in the Glass

by Dale Wimbrow, (c) 1934

When you get what you want in your struggle for pelf,

And the world makes you King for a day,

Then go to the mirror and look at yourself,

And see what that guy has to say.

For it isn't your Father, or Mother, or Wife,

Who judgement upon you must pass.

The feller whose verdict counts most in your life

Is the guy staring back from the glass.

He's the feller to please, never mind all the rest,

For he's with you clear up to the end,

And you've passed your most dangerous, difficult test

If the guy in the glass is your friend.

You may be like Jack Horner and "chisel" a plum,

And think you're a wonderful guy,

But the man in the glass says you're only a bum

If you can't look him straight in the eye.

You can fool the whole world down the pathway of years,

And get pats on the back as you pass,

But your final reward will be heartaches and tears

If you've cheated the guy in the glass.

Dale Wimbrow 1895-1954

"You might be an alcoholic if"

 

-your spring cleaning meant clearing out the alcohol hiding spots, nooks and crannies to make room for the new ones -Brandy

 

-you know more about what's happening in your bartender's life, than in your best friend's. -Sarje

 

-as the sun rises over the curb, you notice you have one shoe on and aren't sure if you lost a shoe or found one. -Frank

 

-you do your recycling at 2am in the morning so no one will see you. -Claudia

 

-you don't remember leaving a bar with a guy, wake up at 2am and find a note from a guy you swear you've never met. You text him. You confirm your worst fear. Then start drinking again. -Kelly E.

 

"If you can't wait to get home from the corner store, so you start drinking your beer while driving home in the car...you might be an alcoholic." -Alvin

 

 

Be sure to join the Recovery Elevator Private Accountability Facebook Group.

Be sure to expand your recovery network in Bozeman and Seattle. Dates for NYC, San Francisco, Denver Costa Rica and Norway are coming soon.

This episode was brought to you by Sober Nation.

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